Thir13en Ghosts Collector’s Edition Blu-ray Haunts In July

THIR13EN GHOSTS filled my horror heart with so much terror. I’ve never seen a movie quite like this one before. He takes the haunted house trope and turns it on its head. The gore-filled special effects looked all too real. The acting is phenomenal. This movie will look great on Blu-ray. I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy. THIR13EN GHOSTS is set to release on July 28th. You can pre-order your copy from Shout Factory.

Synopsis

“A nightmare come true for fans of seriously scary movies!” – Joe Leydon, San Francisco Examiner

What a house! It’s all steel and glass and elegance – and it all belongs to Arthur Kriticos and his family as an unexpected inheritance. You could say it’s their dream home. Especially if the dreams are nightmares.

Awesome ectoplasmic specters populate Thirteen Ghosts, an effects-rampant remake of the 1960 William Castle haunted-house film from producers Gilbert Adler, Joel Silver and Robert Zemeckis, who conjured up the equally terrorific House On Haunted Hill (1999). Tony Shalhoub leads a cast that includes Embeth Davidtz, Matthew Lillard, Shannon Elizabeth, Rah Digga and F. Murray Abraham. The house itself is a design marvel and a mysterious puzzle-cube whose eerie corridors, sliding walls, spinning floors and phantasmic fiends may allow no escape.

Product Information

DISCS
1
RUN-TIME
91 min
ASPECT RATIO ?
1.85:1
COLOR
Color
LANGUAGE
English
REGION
A
RATING
R
PRODUCTION DATE
2001
CLOSED-CAPTIONED ?
No
SUBTITLES
English

[Review] The Creeping Nothingness: The Perfectly Fine House by Stephen Kozeniewski and Wile E. Young

Publisher: Grindhouse Press | Published: March 16th 2020 | Pages: 232


I love haunted house stories. There’s just something about a comfy old house filled with ghosts that makes my horror heart melt. Add in pretty cover art, and I’m hooked for life. What Stephen Kozeniewski and Wile E. Young does so well is transcend the haunted house trope, while creating a beautiful world full of fascinating characters; it’s a truly remarkable feat. Kozeniewski and Young’s writing styles mesh well together, it really is seamless storytelling.

Now, imagine a world where everyone and everything that dies turns into a ghost. Every single place in the world is haunted, save for one house–Jackson Manor. Within the first couple of pages, the reader is left with a burning question: What happened at Jackson Manor? The opening scene chilled me to my core. You can’t ask for a better setup. It pulls you in head first and doesn’t let go until you’ve turned the last page.

Donna Fitzpatrick is a surrogacy agent. She helps ghosts possess volunteers so they can enjoy carnal pleasures. Donna is accompanied by her twin, Kyle, who died in a motorcycle accident fifteen years ago. She’s been working herself to death, but dying isn’t a big deal. After having a panic attack, Kyle insists she take a vacation at the Jackson Manor, an old abandoned mansion. Donna soon realizes something different about the archaic house. And whatever happened at the mansion starts happening in other places. It starts rapidly spreading like a wildfire.

While all of that is going on, you get to know the characters. Poor Kyle. He was treated so badly. I was invested in the twins and their predicament. The authors unfold the story in a timely manner. It doesn’t feel like a 200+ page book. The storyline is taut and unpredictable, making for a compelling read. I had so many emotions reading this book. The authors are not afraid to put their characters in harm’s way. I enjoyed my time in this book, even if it was only for a little while. I didn’t want it to end, so I read it in a couple of sittings.

If you like to feel things when it comes to your horror, then I think you would like The Perfectly Fine House. You can order a copy here.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

In an alternate reality where ghosts are as commonplace as the weather, the most terrifying thing imaginable is a house not being haunted. 

Donna Fitzpatrick runs a surrogacy agency, where ghosts can briefly possess volunteers in order to enjoy carnal pleasures. She’s also working herself into an early grave. But that’s no big deal because death is no worse than puberty. That’s particularly evident in Donna’s twin, Kyle, a self-absorbed roustabout who spends most of his time high on sage. Kyle’s been in arrested development since his motorcycle accident fifteen years ago.

When Donna has a panic attack, Kyle insists she take a vacation at an abandoned mansion. There’s just one small problem: there isn’t a single ghost in Jackson Manor. And while an unhaunted house seems no worse than an oddity at first, soon ghosts go missing, natural disasters consume entire cities, and every afterlife on earth is threatened by the terrible secret behind . . .

THE PERFECTLY FINE HOUSE.

[Review] Canadian Horror At Its Best: The Changeling Turns 40

Director: Peter Madek | Writers: Russel Hunter, William Grey, and Diana Maddox | Released: 28 March 1980 | Run Time: 1h 46min


Forty years ago today, The Changeling was released onto an unsuspecting world. It would go on to become one of the most compelling supernatural thrillers of all time. Haunted House stories terrify people because a home is the one place you feel most secure. This often overlooked Canadian horror film delivers the frights. And it should be in everyone’s personal collection.

After watching his wife and son die in a horrible accident, John Russell (George C. Scott), uproots and moves across the country, where Claire Norman (Trish Van Devere), helps him move into an old mansion where he tries to move on with his life. But the enormous house has other plans for him. The presence gets his attention by shattering windows, doors open and close on their own, and John is led to a boarded up attic room where he finds a kid’s wheelchair amongst all the dust and cobwebs. John immediately realizes something bad happened in the house, so he starts searching for answers. He digs into the history of the mansion and its previous occupants.

John’s research leads him down an unthinkable path. The Changeling is a perfectly paced slow burner. You can sensed the dread easing in with each passing scene. Not only was the plot great, the atmosphere set the tone, allowing the unease to settle on your skin. I love the soundtrack, it really does enhance the tension.

Even though the film is forty years old, The Changeling aged well. It still holds its own to this day. If you don’t have this one in your personal collection, then you should change that immediately.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Perhaps the most chilling supernatural thriller of all time. One of the scariest movies ever made. Scott delivers one of the best performances ever. As a Manhattan composer consumed by grief after his wife and daughter are killed in a shocking accident. When he moves to a secluded Victorian mansion he will find himself haunted by a paranormal entity that may unleash an even more disturbing secret.